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The Beer Catalogue 3rd edition 2019 (vid)

The Beer Catalogue 3rd edition 2019 (vid)

Click here for the catalogue --> goo.gl/P1GqGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backstage video from the making !!

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Moondog's is turning 5!

Moondog's is turning 5!

Moondog's turns 5 and we will celebrate with lots of beer music and fun 🍻🎂🎉.Music by the one and only Honston G 🎧Beer tasting by Beer Shop! Meanwhile, do not miss the launch of our new Beer Catalogue the 3rd edition as well as the video with ‘The Making’Public first time projection will be this Saturday at 22:00! Can be watched below.Stay tuned…

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Ales and lagers? What's the difference?

Ales and lagers? What's the difference?

In the kingdom of beer, there are two large classes: ales and lagers. The former use top-fermenting yeast and require as little as two weeks to make; the latter, bottom-fermenting yeast and require weeks or months to produce. Lagers tend to be smoother, with narrowly-defined flavors. Examples: pilsner, dunkel, Helles, schwarzbier.  Ales tend to be fruitier, with flavors that are more vivid and layered. Examples: India pale ale, pale ale, brown ale, barley wine. Craft breweries produce far more ales than lagers, although there are exceptions.

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What causes a beer's color?

What causes a beer's color?

A beer’s hue is largely a function of the malts used by brewers. Pale malts will deliver a straw- or golden-colored beer; deeply roasted malts, something resembling obsidian. There are fine gradations, which brewers rank by SRM, or Standard Reference Measurement. A light pilsner, for instance, may hit the SRM scale at 2; IPAs are often in the 4 to 10 range; red ales, 30 to 40; while an imperial stout can top the chart at 100.

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